Nature Park ‘Bois de l’Île Bizard’, île Bizard, Ste-Geneviève, Montreal, Quebec

The Nature Park ‘Bois de l’Ile Bizard’ includes sugar maple trees, cedar groves and marshes. It has a magnificent view of the Lake of Two Mountains. This is a place where you can go walking and cycling but also in winter you can practice cross-country skiing (20km) or go snowshoeing (10km). There are several paths in this large star-shaped park; it even has a bridge that crosses the great swamp. You can see some animals like ducks, beavers, turtles, birds. In spring and fall, it’s a good place to watch migrating geese and other birds in the lake. In summer you can also enjoy swimming, canoeing, fishing or having a picnic (barbecue allowed).

Tips

If you want to walk around with your pet, in this park it’s possible.
In winter you have a snowshoe and ski rental on site.
The park is open all year long.

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Skywalk Observatory, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

The Skywalk is an observatory in the headquarter of Back Bay, Boston, Massachusetts, northeast of the United States. It is located at the 50th floor of the Prudential Center and from there you will have impressive 360 degree views of Boston and the surrounding area, and a guided audio tour that will allow you to have a detailed listening making you discover the different buildings, points of historical interest and monuments that make up the landscape. If horizons are clear, it is even possible to see up to 160 km. The building was built in 1964 and receives around 200,000 visitors annually.

Tips

For opening hours and admission price, visit their website.
If you organize a special event (wedding, celebrations , etc.) you can count on the observatory which can accommodate up to 600 guests seated and 1,000 standing .

 

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Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, USA

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, often referred to as The Guggenheim, is an art museum located at 1071 Fifth Avenue on the corner of East 89th Street in the Upper East Side neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It is the permanent home of a renowned and continuously expanding collection of Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, early Modern and contemporary art and also features special exhibitions throughout the year. The museum was established by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in 1939 as the Museum of Non-Objective Painting, under the guidance of its first director, the artist Hilla von Rebay. It adopted its current name after the death of its founder, Solomon R. Guggenheim, in 1952.

In 1959, the museum moved from rented space to its current building, a landmark work of 20th-century architecture. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the cylindrical building, wider at the top than the bottom, was conceived as a temple of the spirit. Its unique ramp gallery extends up from ground level in a long, continuous spiral along the outer edges of the building to end just under the ceiling skylight. The building underwent extensive expansion and renovations in 1992 (when an adjoining tower was built) and from 2005 to 2008.

The museum’s collection has grown organically, over eight decades, and is founded upon several important private collections, beginning with Solomon R. Guggenheim’s original collection.

 

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