Costa Rica wildlife parks – Part 2

More than 25% of Costa Rica’s terrain is contained in national park, reserves, and refuges, protecting the country’s diverse wildlife and preserving the nation’s ecological heritage. Currently, 25 national parks, 58 wildlife refuges, 15 wetlands & mangrove reserves, 11 forest reserves, 8 biological reserves, and other protected areas comprise 161 total parks and 3,223,010 acres (1,304,306 hectares). here is the most visited park.


manuel_antonio_punta_catedralManuel Antonio National Park

Established in 1972, Manuel Antonio is one of the most visited national parks in Costa Rica due to its incredible wildlife viewing and pristine white sand beaches. Here, the rainforest meets the ocean–something one must see in person to truly appreciate.


Arenal-VolcanoArenal Volcano National Park

The Arenal National Park is on every tourist’s must list and while its perfect cone is sometimes hidden away under the clouds, no one ever leaves this area disappointed, quite the opposite. The park protects sixteen reserves that are located between the Tilaran and the Guanacaste mountain ranges. The Arenal Volcano is said to be one of the most active volcanoes of the world.


corcovado-national-parkCorcovado National Park

Corcovado is a true wonder of the world, a magical place in the southern part of the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica, in the Osa Peninsula. It was declared by National Geographic to be one of the most biologically diverse places on Earth.



Sea turtle in Tortuguero National Park, Costa RicaTortuguero National Park

Located in the northeastern region of Costa Rica, Tortuguero National Park is the third most popular park in the country. This park is part of the larger Tortuguero Conservation Area whose aim is to protect endangered species in the region.


CararaCarara National Park

Carara National Park sits near the Costa Rican Pacific coast, in the Central Pacific Conservation Area. Carara lies just about 30 miles west (about an hour) of San José and is home to one of the largest populations of wild Scarlet.



Trinity Bay, Quebec, Canada

Trinity Bay (Baie-Trinité)  is a municipality of Quebec in the Regional Municipality of Comté de Manicouagan on the North Coast. The village was named like that in honor of the Holy Trinity and it has a little more than 450 inhabitants. Located approximately at 721 km from Montreal and 495 km from Quebec City. The main economic activity is forest explotation, followed by the fishing and processing of sea products. It is also famous for its beaches and its thick forest that borders the river St-Laurent. ‘Les Îlets-Caribou and ‘Pointe-des-Monts’ lighthouse (at 10 km from the village) are also part of the municipality of Baie-Trinité. The lighthouse is located where the river becomes gulf; It was built in 1830 and it guided the ships from the Gulf of St-Laurent to Quebec. It was also witness of many shipwrecks. This rocky outcrop is frequented by large marine mammals including the blue whale and the white-sided dolphin.


If you go in Spring, you can practice a little common type of fisheing where you can pick up all “the caplan that rolls’ as you can. This small silver fish illuminates the waters of the gulf, shimmering in the moonlight.
If you like, you can also spend the night in the old lighthouse keeper’s house, in the house or in a tent. If you’re lucky, you could listen to the night concert of the breaths of whales. And in addition it may be that your concert coincides with the multicolored lights of the boreal auroras in the sky.
Take the Anse-aux-bouleaux trail, you’ll have a beautiful panoramic view and an abundance of cetaceans will be at your fingertips. You can also have a picnic on the edge of St-Laurent.
Here you will find toilets, platform tents, benches and tables, bicycles support and interpretive panels of the environmental place.