Schoelcher Library, Fort-de-France, Martinique

The Schoelcher Library, located in Fort-de-France in Martinique, is a public library. It is located at the corner of Liberté St. and Victor Sévère St., facing the north corner of Savane Square. Victor Schoelcher, deputy of Guadeloupe and Martinique (1848-1850) had a collection of 10,000 books and 250 musical scores but since he had no descendants, he left his collection to the General Council of Martinique under condition of create a public library. The building was built by Pierre Henri Picq. The building was built in the garden of the Tuileries in Paris and was first presented to the Parisians (1886-1887), before being dismantled and shipped by boat to Fort-de-France to be rebuilt. Unfortunately, most of the original books disappeared with a large fire in 1890. The library finally opened in 1893. The building, built on a square plan, has a large dome that illuminates the reading room. There is a mix of art nouveau, western classical and Egyptian art and some Byzantine influences. Names of great French writers decorate friezes. There is a very colorful mosaic exterior pediment.

Tips

If you visit Fort-de-France, it’s worth some time to see the library and its building.

If you are lucky, you will find exhibits on site.

Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Lesser Antilles

Saint Kitts is an island in the Lesser Antilles and together with Nièves form the State of St. Kitts and Nevis. Originally called San Cristobal because it was Christopher Columbus that discovered it and baptized it in his name. The island is of volcanic origin and the highest peak is the volcano Liamuiga (1131 meters); which is currently asleep. Between its main cities are Basseterre, Sadlers, Cayon and Sandy Point Town. The island keeps a peculiar character since the time of slavery; a colony of African vervet monkeys or green monkeys, a large free-ranging colony. The economy of the island comes from agriculture, especially sugar cane and its drifts and tourism. The island has sixteen beaches.

Tips

If you visit the island during your cruise, the best way to get a glimpse of the island is to take a taxi, the driver will tell you a bit about the island’s history and show you the more interesting places and if the weather allows you, you can finish your day with a swim in one of its beautiful beaches.

If you want to visit the fortress of Brimstone Hill (1690), classified National Park and inscribed on UNESCO World Heritage, plan a minimum of half a day. It is the ideal place to make beautiful pictures of the neighboring islands and the north of Saint-Christophe. There is a historical museum set up in the citadel’s barracks.

There is also a small two-story tourist train that runs slowly, allowing you to take pictures or videos. You will be accompanied by live songs and depending on who you will have your excursion with, there is also the possibility of a guide in different languages. Alcoholic beverages (with rum, of course) and a few non-alcoholic beverages will be served during the journey.

 

Beach of the Caravelle, Sainte-Anne, Grande-Terre, Guadeloupe

The beach of the Caravelle is a beach adjoining the Club Med in Guadeloupe and of course it is well maintained. But to get to it you have to go a long way by the beaches that are not maintained at all and sometimes it’s a bit difficult if you go with the kids or if you have difficulty walking on a completely irregular path. Once you arrive, you will feel that you are in a place like the beaches you see on the postcards. White sand beach, crystalline water, with plenty of trees to protect from the sun. You can not access to the Club Med but there is a beach bar that is accessible to everyone. There are several aquatic activities to do and it is okay if you go with children as there is not a big slope or big waves, it’s more like a natural pool.

Tips

There is no parking so you will have to leave the car at about a fifteen minute walk. You can also leave the car at Pointe-à-Pitre, take the ferry and walk.

If you do not like bugs, be careful as the iguanas walk between people and pass on your towel without any inconvenience.